Pew Internet has published the report of different generations who are using Internet for 2010 for different purposes, and the results clearly show that the older generations are catching up with younger Internet users, even surpassing them in some online activities.

This report shows different ages people consideration as per their priority, those ages 18 to 33 are more likely to engage in many online activities than older generations, namely social networking, using online classifieds, instant messaging, playing online games, listening to music, participating in virtual worlds and reading blogs.

Users ages 34 to 45, or the Gen X, however, are more likely than Millennials to visit government websites or get their financial information online.

To get the results, Pew Internet surveyed a sample of 2,252 U.S. adults, ages 18 and older between April 29 and May 30, 2010, while the data for teens between 12 and 17 (not included in the graphic) dates back to a survey of 800 teens, conducted June through September 2009. Check out the graphic from the report below, and read the full report here.

Different Internet Generations Statistic Report

Pew Internet has published the report of different generations who are using Internet for 2010 for different purposes, and the results clearly show that the older generations are catching up with younger Internet users, even surpassing them in some online activities.

This report shows different ages people consideration as per their priority, those ages 18 to 33 are more likely to engage in many online activities than older generations, namely social networking, using online classifieds, instant messaging, playing online games, listening to music, participating in virtual worlds and reading blogs.

Users ages 34 to 45, or the Gen X, however, are more likely than Millennials to visit government websites or get their financial information online.

To get the results, Pew Internet surveyed a sample of 2,252 U.S. adults, ages 18 and older between April 29 and May 30, 2010, while the data for teens between 12 and 17 (not included in the graphic) dates back to a survey of 800 teens, conducted June through September 2009. Check out the graphic from the report below, and read the full report here.

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